ANNUAL HENDRICKS AWARD

Dr. Andrew A. Hendricks

Dr. Andrew A. Hendricks descended from the Colonial Dutch. A native of Orange, New Jersey, his fourth-grade assignment on the Dutch in North America grew into a lifelong fascination. Seeing American textbooks neglect the Dutch role, he resolved to "make the Dutch influence come to life." He helped fund, build and design a full-scale replica of de Halve Maen, the ship Henry Hudson sailed to America in 1609 for the Dutch East India Company. For over two decades, de Halve Maen has sailed the eastern seaboard crewed by Dutch and American students, receiving visitors, participating in maritime festivals and appearing in movies and documentaries. To encourage scholarly research he endowed the annual Hendricks Award granted by the New Netherland institute. For his efforts, H.M. Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands appointed Dr. Hendricks a Knight in the Order of Orange Nassau in 2009.

The Annual Hendricks Award is given to the best book or book-length manuscript relating to any aspect of New Netherland and the Dutch colonial experience in North America up to 1776 and its legacy. The award carries a prize of $5,000, as well as a framed print of Len Tantillo's painting Fort Orange and the Patroon’s House. The prize-winner, chosen by a five-member panel of scholars, is selected in May or June. The award is given at a ceremony in conjunction with our Annual Conference held in September. Reasonable travel expenses will be reimbursed.

Two categories of submissions will be considered in alternate years:

(1) recently completed dissertations and unpublished book-length manuscripts, and (2) recently published books. If there is no suitable winner in the designated category in any particular year, submissions from the alternate category will be considered. In addition, submissions from the previous year will be reconsidered for the Award. 

Entries must be based on research completed or published within two years prior to submission. Manuscripts may deal with any aspect of the Dutch colonial experience, as defined above. Biographies of individuals whose careers illuminate aspects of the history of New Netherland and its aftermath are eligible, as are manuscripts dealing with literature and the arts, provided that the methodology is historical. Co-authored books are eligible, but edited collections of articles are not, nor are works of fiction or works of article length. An entry may be a self-nomination, an outside nomination, or in response to invitations to submit from Hendricks Award readers.

Submissions will be judged on three criteria: their contribution to the scholarly understanding of New Netherland and the Dutch colonial experience in North America and/or the legacy of that experience, the quality of the research, and the quality of the writing.  

Three copies of a published book or three clear, readable photocopies of the manuscript must be submitted on or before February 1, with a letter of intent to enter. Copies cannot be returned. Alternatively, manuscript submissions may be in pdf format.

Send PDF submissions to nyslfnn@nysed.gov or to let us know that your materials are in the mail. You will receive a reply confirming the receipt of your mailed materials. Please use 'Hendricks award' in the subject line.

In 2018, the designated category for submission is manuscripts.

Address entries to:
The Annual Hendricks Award Committee
New Netherland Institute Cultural Education Center, Room 10D45
222 Madison Avenue Albany, NY 12230-0001

 

The Annual Hendricks Award Winners:

1987 Oliver A. Rink, Holland on the Hudson: An Economic and Social History of Dutch New York (Cornell University Press, 1986).

1988 Thomas E. Burke, Jr., "The Extremest Part of All: The Dutch Community of Schenectady, New York, 1661-1710 (Ph.D. dissertation State University of New York at Albany, 1984). Published as Mohawk Frontier: The Dutch Community of Schenectady, New York, 1661-1710 (Cornell University Press, 1992).

1989 Firth H. Fabend, A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies, 1660-1800 (Rutgers University Press, 1991).

1990 David William Voorhees, "'In Behalf of the true Protestants religion': The Glorious Revolution in New York" (Ph.D. dissertation, New York University, 1988).

1991 Joyce Goodfriend, Before the Melting Pot: Society and Culture in Colonial New York City, 1664-1730 (Princeton University Press, 1992).

1992 David E. Narrett, Inheritance and Family Life in Colonial New York City (Cornell University Press, 1992).

1993 David S. Cohen, The Dutch-American Farm (New York University Press, 1992).

1994 Martha Dickinson Shattuck, "A Civil Society: Court and Community in Beverwijck, New Netherland, 1652-1664" (Ph. D. dissertation, Boston University, 1993).

1995 Eric Nooter, "Between Heaven and Earth: Church and Society in Pre-Revolutionary Flatbush, Long Island" (Ph.D. dissertation, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1995).

1996 Dennis J. Maika, "Commerce and Community: Manhattan Merchants in the Seventeenth Century" (Ph.D. dissertation, New York University, 1995).

1997 Dennis C. Sullivan, "The Punishment of Crime in Colonial New York: The Dutch Experience in Albany during the Seventeenth Century" (Ph.D. dissertation, State University of New York at Albany, 1995).

1998 Paul A. Otto, "New Netherland Frontier: Europeans and Native Americans along the Lower Hudson River, 1524-1664" (Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana University, 1994).

1999 J. A. Jacobs, "Nieuw-Nederland: het tere begin van een pas ontluikend land" (Ph.D. dissertation, Leiden University, 1999).

2000 Cynthia Van Zandt, "Negotiating Settlement: Colonialism, Cultural Exchange and Conflict in Early Colonial Atlantic North America, 1580-1660" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Connecticut, 2000).

2001 Adriana Van Zwieten, "A Little Land to Sow Some Seeds" (Ph. D. dissertation, Temple University, Philadelphia, 2001).

2002 No recipient

2003 Benjamin Schmidt, Innocence Abroad: the Dutch Imagination and the New World, 1570- 1670 (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

2004 Simon Middleton, Privilege and Profits: Tradesmen in Colonial New York, 1624-1750 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006)

2005 Mark Meuwese, "For the Peace and Well-Being of the Country: Intercultural Mediators and Indian-Dutch Relations in New Netherland and Dutch Brazil (1600-1664)," (Ph.D. dissertation. University of Notre Dame, 2005).

2006 No recipient

2007 1) Jeroen van den Hurk, "Imagining New Netherland: Origins and Survival of Netherlandic Architecture in Old New York, 1614-1776" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Delaware, 2006).

2007 2) Kees Jan Waterman, To Do Justice to Him and Myself': Evert Wendel's Account Book of the Fur Trade with Indians in Albany, New York, 1695-1726 (American Philosophical Society, 2008).

2008 W. Th. M. Frijhoff, Fulfilling God's Mission: The Two Worlds of Dominie Everardus Bogardus, 1607-1647, Myra Heerspink Scholz, trans. (Leiden: Brill, 2007).

2009 James Bradley, Before Albany: An Archeology of Native-Dutch Relations in the Capital Region, 1600-1664 (Albany: New York State Museum Bulletin 509, 2007).

2010 Dirk Mouw, "Moederkerk and Vaderland: Religion and Ethnic Identity in the Middle Colonies, 1690-1772" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Iowa, 2009).

2010* Honorable Mention was awarded to Deborah L. Krohn, Marybeth De Filippis, and Peter Miller, eds. Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).

2011 Janny Venema, Kiliaen van Rensselaer (1586-1643): Designing a New World (Hilversum: Verloren, 2010).

2012 1) Danny Norlander, "Serving God and Mammon: The Reformed Church and the Dutch West India Company in the Atlantic World, 1621 – 1674," (Ph.D. dissertation, Georgetown University, 2011).

2012 2) Evan Haefeli, New Netherland and the Dutch Origin of American Religious Liberty (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012).

2013  Susanah Shaw Romney,“Intimate Networks: Personal Relationships and Atlantic Ties in New Netherland, 1609 -1664” subsequently published as New Netherland Connections: Intimate Networks and Atlantic Ties in Seventeenth-Century America.

2014 Jeroen Dewulf, "The Pinkster King and the King of Kongo: African-American Performance Culture and the Master-Slave Relationship in Dutch-American Society from New Amsterdam to New York."

2015 Donna Merwick, Stuyvesant Bound: An Essay on Loss Across Time (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013).

2016 Deborah Hamer, "Creating an Orderly Society: The Regulation of Marriage and Sex in the Dutch Atlantic World, 1621–1674” (Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 2014).

2017 Kenneth Shefsiek, Set in Stone: Creating and Commemorating a Hudson Valley Culture (SUNY Press, 2017).

About the New Netherland Institute

For a quarter century NNI has helped cast light on America's Dutch roots. In 2010, it partnered with the New York State Office of Cultural Education to establish the New Netherland Research Center, with matching funds from the State of the Netherlands. NNI is registered as a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Contributions are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law. More

The New Netherland Research Center

Housed in the New York State Library, the NNRC offers students, educators, scholars and researchers a vast collection of early documents and reference works on America's Dutch era. Directed by Dr. Charles Gehring. More

 

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